Adding the Growmap Anti Spambot Plugin, gasp, to Your WordPress Site or Blog Comments Section


For some reason computercrooks.com seems to attract a lot of spambots. Perhaps they can smell canned luncheon meat and begin to circle, hoping to attract a friend? Whatever the reason, I’m getting a bit tired of moderating a fairly lengthy daily stream of ads for Gucci bags and SEO optimization programs. So I started looking for a free plugin to reduce the amount of spam coming in.

I did a search of a dozen financial blogs to see what it looked like they were using. By browsing using Firefox and right clicking on the relevant part of their comments page, I was able to check that several of them were using GASP. GASP turned out to be the Growmap Anti Spambot Plugin.

I decided to review it. Everything sounded interesting on the wordpress.org site. The next step would be to download and try it.

Downloading the GASP Anti Spam plugin

First I had to register with WordPress.org. For instructions, see my post How to Register at WordPress.org

Next I logged in to my WordPress.org account. If you want to try this plugin, here’s what to do next:

  1. Navigate to http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/growmap-anti-spambot-plugin/
  2. Click on the Download Version button.
  3. If necessary, select Save File and the destination on your hard drive to save it to.
  4. Logout of WordPress.org.
  5. Right click on the filename and select Extract All.
  6. Open and read the ReadMe file.

One of the questions mentions that by changing the Checkbox Name value in the settings page to something new, you can reduce the chance of spambots figuring out GASP.

It also says you only need to configure the file by specifying which error messages to show when the user forgets to check the checkbox or if no checkbox is present.


Uploading the GASP plugin

  1. Start your file transfer program such as FileZilla.
  2. Connect to your host account such as HostGator.
  3. Navigate to the directory where you want to add the plugin. Usually this will be something like
    public_html/wp-content/plugins
  4. Upload the folder for the unzipped plugin.
    For example, I uploaded the folder
    growmap-anti-spambot-plugin.1.2
    and all of its contents to
    default_html/computercrooks.com/wp-content/plugins
  5. Disconnect from the server.
  6. Logout of the File Transfer program.

Activating the Plugin

  1. Next, login to your WordPress account.
  2. From the menu on the left hand side, click on Plugins.
  3. For the Growmap Anti Spambot Plugin, click on Activate.

Updating the Plugin Settings

  1. For the Growmap Anti Spambot Plugin, click on Settings.
  2. In the Checkbox Label field, make any changes desired to the text shown beside the check box in the Comments section.
    For example, I changed it to read:
    Please confirm you are not a SPAM robot by clicking on this checkbox. Thank you!
  3. If you want to you can change the Checkbox Name field to make it more difficult for the spam robots to guess the value.
  4. Update the Checkbox Not Checked message, if desired.
    For example, I used
    Please check the box to confirm that you are not posting spam. Thanks!
  5. Update the No Checkbox message, if desired.
    For example, I used
    You may have disabled javascript. Please enable javascript if you wish to leave a comment on this site. You can also email me a comment using the address on the Contact Us page, if you prefer.
  6. Update the Hidden Email Field Completed message, if desired.
    For example, I used
    You have been mistaken for a spam robot. Please contact the site using the Contact Us page instead.
  7. When you have made all the updates you want, click on the Save Changes button.
  8. Logout of your WordPress account.

Related Reading

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Do you use GASP? Please share your experiences with a comment.

3 thoughts on “Adding the Growmap Anti Spambot Plugin, gasp, to Your WordPress Site or Blog Comments Section

  1. Hello. You said you were going to review gasp. That’s why I visited you. So where is the review?
    Regards, Don

  2. Google actually does penalize sites for spammy incoming links now – it’s part of the Penguin update. While I know it’s not the point of this post, I did want to bring attention to that.

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